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Ibm 12 Atom Storage Device Proposal


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#1 flyingfisch

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 11:19 AM

http://www.ibm.com/s...ale_memory.html

Apparently, a bit would be determined by the orientation of the 12 atoms. Definitely reaching the 1-bit-per-atom theoretical limit.

#2 MicroPro

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 06:27 PM

Pretty amazing, and is more amazing if you think we can one day control sub-atom particles too.

#3 flyingfisch

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 06:29 PM

Pretty amazing, and is more amazing if you think we can one day control sub-atom particles too.


Yeah, actually it got me to thinking about whether you could take it down to an atom size but then somehow store more information than a bit by giving it a higher base.... not sure how it would be done, but maybe you could make different elements represent different numbers or something.

#4 MicroPro

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 06:42 PM

Maybe it's worth knowing that they wanted to do multi-level logic even before inventing binary digits. The mathematical parts are already invented, but not applied; at least with electrical current and voltage it's not trivial to implement.

#5 Forty-Two

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 04:42 PM

Wow, this is really interesting. Hopefully it will hit the market in the next 10 years.

#6 flyingfisch

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 05:56 PM

Wow, this is really interesting. Hopefully it will hit the market in the next 10 years.


Yeah, hopefully, we'll have to see.

I actually find it kind of interesting to note that it is only ~160 times denser than NAND... for some reason I thought it would be denser than that.

Another thing, I wonder if these will be more or less reliable than other hard drives. And another question is how fast it would be.

#7 MicroPro

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 08:47 PM

It's not something new, it has been always researched on. The problem is, you'll need much more components to store and keep one cell of n-ary value than you need in a binary circuit.

#8 flyingfisch

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 08:50 PM

Ah, I see. Actually, I wonder if it would be ready for personal use any time soon since it would essentially need an electron microscope built into it to operate.




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