Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Learning C++


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Karan901

Karan901

    Casio Addict

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 71 posts

  • Calculators:
    Fx-9860GII

Posted 06 July 2013 - 01:46 AM

Hi i've recently started reading through some online sites about learning C++ and need some good websites/books/subscriptions that can help me to learn programming. I know it will take time and effort but i would like to have basics covered/decent knowledge by the end of about 2-3 months (during this period i am free most of the day to work on skills). So does anyone have any tips or recommendations on how to go about learning?

#2 3298

3298

    Casio Addict

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germany

  • Calculators:
    fx-9750G Plus
    Algebra FX 2.0 (ROM 1.03,broken)
    HP 50G

Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:50 PM

It's somewhat hidden, but here (and the two posts below the linked one) are tips we gave to another UCF member when he asked where to start with C/C++. They should be general enough to work for you as well, but please keep in mind that especially my own tips are based on how I did it, so they might not be optimal.

#3 0x2333

0x2333

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:China
  • Interests:Compilers

  • Calculators:
    FX-82ES,FX-991ES+,FX-9750GII

Posted 16 December 2016 - 07:56 AM

To learn C++, You'd better learn plain C first.

C is a sub set of C++, and C++ is just the "C with class".

I've got two sites about C learning.

Here it is: http://publications....t.co.uk/c_book/

(This is an on-line C programming tutorial book)

And when you programming with C. You need to retrieve libraries and functions from here:

http://www.cplusplus.com

As for you wanna programming on the embedded systems (like calculators) you need specific reference or manuals of that micro-controller

and IDE, C-compilers.

As for C++, there is a less people who use C++ for embedded system developing.

Cuz It's hard to operate with low-level hardware facilities with a Object-Oriented language.

Also there's a lot of paper-book you can buy to learning C/C++. here is one example:

"The C Programming Language" written by Dennis Ridge-the father of C.

GOOD LUCK.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users